Monday, June 9, 2008

Sweating it out

95+ degrees and 90% humidity. Definitely not priming weather. Not really sanding weather either.

The cabin and cockpit well is machine sanded. I need to go back and hand sand the corners. Today I got chased out by thunderstorms. I can only manage a few hours a day in the heat anyway. After a while my sweat starts running faster than I can clear off my sunglasses and working without sunglasses leaves me blind. The respirator also starts filling up with sweat and dripping icky stuff all over my clean white deck. And then there is the onset of heat stroke symptoms. Cooler temps are expected in a couple of days.

The deck is 95% covered. I think one more coat will be needed before I am happy with it. I should have done the outer edges when I did the cabin top so now I still need to do that. The hull is just waiting for better temperature/humidity conditions before putting on some gray primer. I am expecting/hoping that my priming technique has improved and I won't have to machine sand again. Just in case I bought some more sandpaper but I think I am down to the handsanding only phase. I have used a full 50 pack of 220 grit sandpaper on this latest round of sanding.

A buddy of mine is having some mooring troubles and since I won't be in this year he asked if he could borrow my anchor temporarily. "Sure, no problem, here is my 33lb Genuine Bruce and 30 feet of 3/8" BBB chain." "What's the problem anyway?"... Seems there is a vigilante lobsterboat/clammer running down the channel cutting people's mooring pendants. I am going to cry if I lose my Bruce.

Oh well, at least I got a free lunch out of the deal.

Time for a cold shower.

10 comments:

brushfiremedia said...

A snorkle, fins, cover of darkness, and bit and brace should solve the mooring problem.

britton said...

The actual culprit is yet to be found. The suspect pool is narrowing though. At some point, someone is going to find their boat on the bottom (if they are lucky).

The drums of war are echoing on the far hills...

Tim said...

I hear that Britton is very good at stealthy anchoring-related missions under the cover of darkness, and fortified by Mt. Gay.

http://www.dasein668.com/art/sailing/2005/cruise05/072605k.jpg

Tim said...

The last part of that link is 072608k.jpg

brushfiremedia said...

Try this link.

Tim said...

Show off.

britton said...

At least I didn't sit in the cockpit and forever wonder about it. The question was raised. It was a good question. I took steps to answer it. A man of resolve. A man of action. A man not afraid to answer life's toughest questions. I think I remember my soundings around his boat to have been about 3 feet. That boat must have drawn a minimum of 4. Still stuck fast when we left on a rising tide the next morning if I recall.

brushfiremedia said...

I don't know about all that, Britton. But it certainly was one of the highlights from that cruise!

Tim said...

We didn't sit in the cockpit and wonder about it: we delegated the important task of answering the pressing question to the man we knew would be right for the job.

britton said...

and I am happy to report "Mission Accomplished"!